Current Graduate Students

Nathan E. Harms

Nathan E. Harms

Ph.D. student (2015-2020)

Dissertation Project

Nathan is a research biologist with the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center in Vicksburg, MS. While employed with the Corps, he is earning his PhD. Nathan is interested in the biological control and management of wetland invasive plant species. Specifically, he is studying flea beetle (Agasicles hygrophila) control of alligatorweed (Alternanthera philoxeroides). Historically, flea beetles have been very successful in controlling alligatorweed but an interesting phenomenon is now occurring with this system. Alligatorweed has been expanding northward but the flea beetles have lagged behind. Nathan plans to study this issue with a particular focus on biological control at species range margins.

  • B.S., University of Texas (2003)
  • M.S., University of North Texas (2010)

  Nathan.E.Harms@usace.army.mil

Rachel Harman

Rachel Harman

Ph.D. student (2014-2020)

Dissertation Project

Rachel is interested in the effects of density-dependent emigration (DDE) on the population dynamics of competing species. She is particularly interested in comparing traditional forms of DDE (where dispersal increases linearly with density) with non-tradition forms such as negative or U-shaped DDE (see Harman et al. in review). She is also interested in life-history tradeoffs at range margins using Tribolium flour beetles as a model system. Her goal is to combine experimental studies with mathematical models to understand their effects on population dynamics.

  • B.S., Indiana University, Purdue University Fort Wayne (2012)
  • M.S., Indiana University, Purdue University Fort Wayne (2014)

  rharma2@lsu.edu

Herie Lee

Herie Lee

M.S. student (2019-2021)

Thesis Project

Herie is interested in roseau cane dieback in the Mississippi River Delta. She is particularly interested in developing and testing methods for restoring marsh habitats in areas of dieback as well as in newly created habitats formed from dredging the waterways.

  • B.S., Louisiana State University (2018)

  hlee41@lsu.edu

Lori Radunzel-Davis

D. Lori Radunzel-Davis

M.S. student (2017-2019)

Thesis Project

Lori is jointly advised by Erik Aschehoug (Norwegian University of Life Sciences) and me. She has been studying plant-soil feedbacks in cogongrass (Imperata cylindrica), specifically focusing on legacy effects on native plant species. Lori recently successfully defended her thesis.

  • B.S., University of Wisconsin

  lradun1@lsu.edu

Technicians

Warwick Allen

Joseph Johnston



Joe is supported by our USDA grant and plays an integral role in our research on roseau cane dieback in the Mississippi River Delta. He takes care of our plants and runs our garden experiments. We’re trying to convince Joe to pursue a graduate degree.

  johnston@lsu.edu

Undergraduate Students

Amanda Monceaux

Amanda Monceaux

Senior
NSF-Undergraduate Researcher
  amonce1@lsu.edu
Matthew Berry

Matthew Berry

Senior
NSF-Undergraduate Researcher
  mberry7@lsu.edu
Charles Marshall Stephenson and Celine Rochon

Charles “Marshall” Stephenson

Junior
NSF-Undergraduate Researcher
  cstep35@lsu.edu


Celine Rochon

Junior
NSF-Undergraduate Researcher
  crocho2@lsu.edu

Past Graduate Students

Warwick Allen

Warwick Allen

Ph.D. student (2011-2017)

Dissertation Project

Warwick’s dissertation focused on two main research areas: invasive plant - herbivore - predator interactions and how they vary in space (see Allen et al 2017) and direct and indirect effects of soil microorganisms on invasion success and plant-plant interactions. His research focused primarily on the wetland invader, Phragmites australis. After graduating in 2017, Warwick has moved on to a postdoc at Lincoln University in New Zealand.

  • B.S., Lincoln University, New Zealand (2009)

  warwick.j.allen@gmail.com

Ganesh Bhattarai

Ganesh Bhattarai

Ph.D. Louisiana State University (2015)

Dissertation Project

Ganesh's research focused on a large-scale, biogeographic approach to studying invasive plant species. Chapters in his dissertation addressed the effects of large-scale disturbances on the proliferation and spread of the invasive plant, Phragmites australis, the ecology and evolution of latitudinal gradients in P. australis - herbivore interactions, and apparent competition between native and invasive genotypes of P. australis and how it varies with latitude.

  • B.S., Prithvi Narayan Campus, Tribhuvan University, Nepal (1997)
  • M.Sc., Central Department of Botany, Tribhuvan University, Nepal (2000)
  • M.S., Texas Christian University (2007)
  • Ph.D. Louisiana State University (2015)
  • Current Position:
  • Postdoctoral Associate
  • Department of Entomology
  • Kansas State University
  • Manhattan, KS, 66506, USA

  bhattaraigp@gmail.com

Anthony Chow

Anthony Chow

Thesis Project

Anthony's research focused on the latitudinal variation in competitive ability of Phragmites australis and its role in invasion success.

  • B.S., University of Tennessee (2009)
  • M.S., Louisiana State University (2014)

  achow2@tigers.lsu.edu

Forrest Dillemuth

Forrest Dillemuth

Dissertation Project

Impact of invasive plant species on community structure. Forrest is interested in the invasion and spread of brome grass (Bromus inermis) in the tall-grass prairies of the Great Plains. His research has shown that brome is rapidly displacing native grasses, and altering the dispersal behavior and increasing the extinction risk of native insect species.

Dissertation Title: Invasion of smooth brome into North American tall-grass prairies: impact on native plant/herbivore species and mechanisms responsible for successful invasion.

  • B.S., Louisiana State University (2003)
  • M.S., Louisiana State University (2012)

  fdille1@lsu.edu

  • Current Position:
  • Postdoctoral Associate
  • Louisiana State University
  • Advisor: Bret Elderd
Amanda Accamando

Amanda Accamando

Thesis Project

For many plant speices, chemical and morphological defenses against herbivory induced upon herbivore attack. A plant's resistance to herbivory also may be influenced indirectly by its neighbors, that is, by the diversity and composition of the plant community. Amanda's objective is to examine how the efficacy of induced defenses is influenced by the context of the community. She plans to manipulate the species composition and defensive strategies (e.g., constitutive or induced defense levels) of neighboring plants and quantify their effects on the herbivory of a target plant species (soybeans) that either possess or lack the ability to induce a defense.

  • B.S., State University of New York, Geneseo (2000)
  • M.S., Louisiana State University (2011)

  aaccam1@lsu.edu

Alyssa Hakes

Alyssa Hakes

Dissertation Title

Mechanisms Promoting Spatial and Temporal Variability in Plant Defense

  • B.S., University of Illinois (2003)
  • Ph.D., Louisiana State University (2010)
  • Postdoctoral Associate, Florida State University (2010-2012)

  alyssa.s.hakes@lawrence.edu

  • Current Position:
  • Assistant Professor
  • Department of Biology
  • Lawrence University
  • Appleton, WI
Heather Jackson

Heather Jackson

Dissertation Title

From Indidvidual Dispersal Behavior to the Multiscale Distribution of a Saproxylic Beetle.

  • B.S., Brigham Young University (2001)
  • M.S., Brigham Young University (2004)
  • Ph.D., Louisiana State University (2010)
  • Postdoctoral Associate, Carelton University, Ottawa, Canada

  hjacks15@utk.edu

  • Current Position:
  • Research Assistant Professor
  • Department of Ecology and Evolution
  • University of Tennessee
  • Knoxville, TN
Kyle Haynes

Kyle Haynes

Dissertation Title

Landscape heterogeneity and the spatial ecology of a prairie planthopper.

  • B.S., University of California, Santa Barbara (1994)
  • M.S., Utah State University (1998)
  • Ph.D., Louisiana State University (2004)

  haynes@virginia.edu

  • Current Position:
  • Research Assistant Professor
  • Department of Environmental Sciences
  • University of Virginia
  • (webpage)
Allison Poff

Allison Poff

Thesis Title

Adaptive oviposition behaviour in the goldenrod stem galler, Eurosta solidaginis (Diptera: Tephritidae).

  • B.S., University of Manitoba (1999)
  • M.S., University of North Dakota (2003)
Mark Williams

Mark Williams

Thesis Title

Response of a Gall-forming Guild (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) to Stressed and Vigorous Prairie Roses

  • B.S., Missouri Southern State University (1998)
  • M.S., University of North Dakota (2000)

  markalanwilliams@hotmail.com

  • Current Position:
  • Ph.D. Student
  • University of Wyoming

Past Postdoctoral Associates

Kristen Baum

Kristen Baum

Research

Kristen examined the impact of the matrix on the efficacy of corridors and stepping stones. She also played a significant role in the development of the study on dead-wood arthropods.

  • B.S., The College of William and Mary (1994)
  • M.S., Texas A&M University (1999)
  • Ph.D., Texas A&M University (2003)

  kristen.baum@okstate.edu

  • Current Position:
  • Assistant Professor
  • Department of Zoology
  • Oklahoma State University
  • Stillwater, OK
  • (webpage)